Asymmetric cadherin's junctions found in migrating endothelial cells

Asymmetric cadherin's junctions found in migrating endothelial cells

Polarized membrane tension in cell migrating in vitro

Polarized membrane tension in cell migrating in vitro

Protrusion-retraction cycles in endothelial cells

Protrusion-retraction cycles in endothelial cells

E2F1 mRNA in cells expressing cell cycle fluorescent activity reporters

E2F1 mRNA in cells expressing cell cycle fluorescent activity reporters

The Meyer lab seeks to understand how human cells sense hormones, growth factors, cell contacts and stress and how they integrate and transduce these signals to make decisions to polarize, move or divide. We investigate these cellular regulatory systems by identifying key signaling components and measure when and where signaling occurs by using live-cell microscopy approaches to watch cells signal and decide to move forward or enter the cell cycle. Our projects are focused on understanding the general principles of how mammalian signal transduction systems work which requires the development and application of new experimental and analysis tools including advanced fluorescent microscopy techniques, small molecule and light perturbations, systematic genomic and targeted screens, RNAseq technologies, bioinformatics, organoids and other in vitro and in vivo models, and quantitative modeling of signaling pathways.

Our Research Recent Publications Meet The Lab

News

The Lab went to an Earthquakes Game!

The Lab went to an Earthquakes Game!

The Lab went to the California Clasico at Stanford Stadium to watch the San Jose Earthquakes defeat the LA Galaxy 2-0!

Leighton and Lindsey’s Review in Current Opinion in Cell Biology!

Leighton and Lindsey’s Review in Current Opinion in Cell Biology!

Putting the brakes on the cell cycle: mechanisms of cellular growth arrest

The Meyer Lab went to Bocce Ball!

The Meyer Lab went to Bocce Ball!

The Meyer Lab ventured to Campo di Bocce in Los Gatos to celebrate Min's time in the lab!

Chad and Min Graduated!

Chad and Min Graduated!

Chad is starting a postdoc at Genentech and Min is starting a Postdoc in the Rando Lab at Stanford. Good luck to you both!

Contact

Meyer Lab
Address:

Chemical and Systems Biology
318 Campus Drive, Clark Building W200
Stanford University Medical Center Stanford
CA 94305-5174

Email:

tlc95@stanford.edu

Telephone:

(650) 723 9819